Garden Season Wrap-up Part 2

The last garden harvest - quite a haul
The last garden harvest – quite a haul

The last garden wrap-up post revered all the fresh garden produce. This is Part 2 and it not only celebrates the last haul, but also digs into the dirt of garden work. Best to harvest and save all the green produce you can; it might ripen up if you place it in a cool, dry place.

Now, there is a lot of postseason gardening work to do to winterize your garden. Get ready to dig in the dirt…

Pull It Up

Withered tomato plants and stakes
Withered tomato plants and stakes

First, you have to pull up the very long stakes that you use to stabilize the growing tomato plants. Long poles can be unwieldy! You can see the withered tomato plants. Time for them to come up.

The Dirty Work

Hauling away tomato debris
Hauling away tomato debris

Next you have to pull up the plants themselves. It’s really not as hard as you might think. The plant is usually taller than I am, and strong enough to hold many heavy tomatoes, but the roots are shallow so it’s easy to pull up the whole plant, especially if the soil is a little moist.

Cucumber vines and bean plants have long ago stopped producing. They pull up very easily.

I stack up the plants on a tarp to haul to the compost pile. This part is quite messy. Dirt goes everywhere, you’re pretty much covered head-to-toe by this time.

 

But, digging in the dirt is one of the joys of gardening. Enjoy this part! I told you there was a lot of postseason gardening work.

Supply Storage

Packing away the cages and stakes
Packing away the cages and stakes

Then, you have to pull up the cages. Stacking them together is more cumbersome than anything!

Haul the poles and cages to a covered area to hole up for the winter months.

Raking- Don’t Skip This Step

Goodbye tomato plants, until next spring
Goodbye tomato plants, until next spring

Lastly, you rake, and rake, and rake. You never get up everything, but it’s a good practice to clear out old debris, especially if any of the foliage had signs of the common tomato fungus, blight.

Even if tempted, do not skip the raking step. Next spring, you’ll be glad you did the postseason clean-up work.  Did I mention before that there is a lot of  postseason gardening work, and it is dirt-y?

What’s Left

A few banana, cayenne, and jalapeno pepper plants remain
A few banana, cayenne, and jalapeno pepper plants remain

There are a few plants left. Some of the sweet banana peppers, cayennes, and jalapenos are still in the garden. Maybe a few more will ripen over the next few weeks.

Brussel sprouts and sweet potato vines extend the season
Brussel sprouts and sweet potato vines extend the season

 

 

There are a few Brussel sprout plants left too. I’ve harvested most of the lower hanging sprouts, but the upper fruits will thrive in the cooler temps.

And, there are a lot of sweet potato vines left in the garden. They’ll be OK until the first frost. It will be digging time soon.

And That’s a Garden Wrap-Up, Part 2

Enjoy being outside working in the garden this fall. It’s a good feeling to wrap-up the garden in a caring, methodical manner. It’s a positive step for a happy life – taking care of your land, digging in the dirt, following the seasons of the garden.

See you on the blog!

 

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