Pumpkin Spice and Everything Nice

That’s what fall is made of – pumpkin this, pumpkin that, and it’s all good.

Fall pumpkins stacked like a snowman.
Fall pumpkins stacked like a snowman.

In keeping with the blog post about going outside, which you can read here, we ventured out to the pumpkin patch. Actually, the pumpkin patch has a lot more than pumpkins.

If you read my blog post about a bountiful tomato harvest, which you can read here, know that I continue to be impressed with and inspired by nature. Pumpkins seem to produce bountiful harvests too.

Pumpkins

Warty pumpkin
Warty pumpkin

There are many of the beautiful, traditional orange pumpkins, but there are also unique varieties that add color, contrast, and interest to the world of pumpkins. There are white, green, pastel, red, and multi-colored pumpkins. There are striped pumpkins. There are double pumpkins, mini pumpkins and HUGE pumpkins. Among the most unusual are bumpy pumpkins, which some people call “warty” to go along with the Halloween witch theme.

Pie pumpkins for baking
Pie pumpkins for baking

And don’t forget the small baking pumpkins; they’re perfect for making seasonal favorites such as pumpkin pie and pumpkin bread. Did I mention how much I like pumpkin seeds?  Ever wonder where all the pumpkin spice comes from?

 

Gourds

Mix of colorful gourds
Mix of colorful gourds

At the pumpkin patch you’ll also find gourds in all extremes of shapes, sizes and colors. You can compile quite a collection of interesting objects to make a seasonal display on your front porch or to make a long-lasting centerpiece.

Squash

Butternut, Spaghetti and Acorn Squash
Butternut, Spaghetti and Acorn Squash

There are also many types of vegetables mixed in with the pumpkins and gourds at the pumpkin patch. You can find several varieties of squash. They’re know as winter squash and you can cook with them. Try the spaghetti squash, acorn squash, or the most familiar butternut squash. They have the advantage of being able to be stored at room temperature for long periods. So, mix them in the centerpiece you make with the gourds, then pull out one at a time for your meal.

Corn

One of my fall favorites is colorful, dried corn. It seems to me to be a traditional change-of-seasons icon. Maybe that means I like corn in all states: on the cob, dried, and popped! Maybe that is why going out to the pumpkin patch is a positive step for a happy life!

Colorful dried corn
Colorful dried corn
Colorful fall flowers
Colorful fall flowers

Seeing the change in color scheme of fall flowers is a signal that we’re changing seasons, once again. It’s all good. Time to move along and enjoy the present.

No wonder we have officially entered the season which could be called pumpkin everything: pie, latte, spice, seeds, bread, muffins, pancakes, risotto, curry, ravioli, hummus, granola, ice cream, cheesecake, chutney, soup, butter, … you get the idea – pumpkin everything!

That’s what fall is made of – pumpkin this, pumpkin that, and it’s all nice. It’s a great motto!

See you on the blog!

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